Our Beliefs

The very essence of Lutheranism can be described as this:

  • We are saved by the grace of God alone — not by anything we do;
  • Our salvation is through faith alone — a confident trust in God, who in Christ promises us forgiveness, life and salvation; and
  • The Bible is the norm for faith and life — the true standard by which teachings and doctrines are to be judged.

 

ELCA Confession of Faith

What we believe in the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

  • This church confesses the Triune God, Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.
  • This church confesses Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior and the Gospel as the power of God for the salvation of all who believe
  1. Jesus Christ is the Word of God incarnate, through whom everything was made and through whose life, death, and resurrection God fashions a new creation.
  2. The proclamation of God’s message to us as both Law and Gospel is the Word of God, revealing judgment and mercy through word and deed, beginning with the Word in creation, continuing in the history of Israel, and centering in all its fullness in the person and work of Jesus Christ.
  3. The canonical Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments are the written Word of God. Inspired by God’s Spirit speaking through their authors, they record and announce God’s revelation centering in Jesus Christ. Through them God’s Spirit speaks to us to create and sustain Christian faith and fellowship for service in the world.
  • This church accepts the canonical Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments as the inspired Word of God and the authoritative source and norm of its proclamation, faith, and life.
  • This church accepts the Apostles’, Nicene, and Athanasian Creeds as true declarations of the faith of this church.
  • This church accepts the Unaltered Augsburg Confession as a true witness to the Gospel, acknowledging as one with it in faith and doctrine all churches that likewise accept the teachings of the Unaltered Augsburg Confession.
  • This church accepts the other confessional writings in the Book of Concord, namely, the Apology of the Augsburg Confession, the Smalcald Articles and the Treatise, the Small Catechism, the Large Catechism, and the Formula of Concord, as further valid interpretations of the faith of the Church.
  • This church confesses the Gospel, recorded in the Holy Scriptures and confessed in the ecumenical creeds and Lutheran confessional writings, as the power of God to create and sustain the Church for God’s mission in the world.
  • We are part of God’s unfolding plan.

When we gather for worship, we connect with believers everywhere and of every time.

When we study the Bible and pray, we are drawn more deeply into God’s own saving story.

When we serve others and address social issues that affect the common good, we live out our Christian faith.

 

The Holy Bible

The Bible is the norm for faith and life — the true standard by which teachings and doctrines are to be judged.

The Bible creates and nurtures faith through the work of the Holy Spirit and points us to Jesus Christ, the living Word and center of our faith. And in reading the Bible, we are invited into a relationship with God that both challenges us and promises us new life.

To borrow a phrase from Luther, the Bible is “the manger in which the Word of God is laid.” It is the primary and authoritative witness to the church’s faith. Written and transcribed by many authors over a period of many centuries, the Bible bears remarkable testimony to the mighty acts of God in the lives of people and nations.

  • We are saved by the grace of God alone — not by anything we do;
  • Our salvation is through faith alone — a confident trust in God, who in Christ promises us forgiveness, life and salvation; and

 

The Sacraments of the Lutheran Church:

A sacrament is the physical sign of an unseen promise. Sacraments are rites of the church that convey God’s forgiveness, life and salvation through words and physical means. Lutherans celebrate the sacraments of Baptism and Holy Communion.

 

 

 

 

Baptism

Baptism is the entry rite into Christian faith. It is an act instituted by God, performed using water in the name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, whereby the baptized is united with Christ. God freely offers his grace and lovingly establishes a new community. It is in Baptism that people become members of Christ’s Body on earth, the Church.

 


Holy Communion

In Holy Communion, also called the Eucharist, Lutherans recall the saving acts of God through Word, bread and wine, and are connected with Christ and with Christians of all times and places. In this sacrament we are fed with the Body and Blood of Christ. This gift is itself the real presence of God’s forgiveness and mercy, nourishing believers in union with their Lord and with each other.